The weird side of life on Loch Tay

The weird side of life on Loch Tay

To mark Friday the 13th, in a leap year, just after a full moon, this blog post is going to talk about some of the weirder things that have happened on Loch Tay. Building and living on a crannog is a peculiar thing to do in itself, and being out on the water gives you...
Further funding awarded

Further funding awarded

The Living on Water team is very happy to announce that we have been awarded over £9000 by the NEIF Radiocarbon Fund to radiocarbon date a series of contexts from terrestrial roundhouses around Loch Tay in support of our At the Water’s Edge investigations. The...

Upcoming Living on Water Talks

Our first batch of tree-ring results should be coming in over the next few weeks, and we are very excited to see what our sampling last summer turned up. However, in the meantime, the project will be presenting what we have done and know so far in a series of upcoming...
The Trees of Oakbank Crannog

The Trees of Oakbank Crannog

Crannogs are substantial timber constructions. While there is some debate on exactly how crannogs were constructed, wood is the primary material used (although there are exceptions in some parts of Scotland). As Oakbank is one of the most extensively excavated...